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Guiding principles of benefits management

During our work to support organisations deliver benefits driven change, maturity assessments and adopting programme management, we have become aware of a number of underpinning principles that are common amongst organisations that are successful.

Here are a few key pointers that we hope will help you along

Please click here for the guiding principles of benefits management

Talking About Project Management to the Ugandan Young Leaders

This is a really nice video from our archive when we were working closely with a charity to deliver project management in Uganda.

On a visit to Uganda last week, Rob Newman (the Tag Rugby Trust Treasurer) had a heart warming chat with the Uganda young leaders about project management. As part of our fundraising, we are creating a project management eLearning course and raising money for tablets to enhance the young leaders knowledge skill set for the future. We are proud to be a part of creating a future for these bright young people.

Managing project costs

Performance against forecasted budget is an essential reporting requirement. The main costs for a project will come under two headings: resources and assets. The control activities around costs are very much linked to the controls around time as the time required from the resources represents significant costs.

Rod Sowden in full flow
Listen up guys

If this is an area that you are interested in finding out more about, why not have a look at our guidance page and example technique

Free Programme Management Interactive Executive Briefing!

This interactive briefing outlines the key concepts of programme management and the principal roles and themes that make programmes distinctive from portfolios and projects.

It is in the form of an interactive PDF to make it a little bit more interestting

Right click and save as this link to download the interactive briefing, please view it in Acrobat or Adobe Reader.

12 things you should know about PMQ (APMP)

APM – Project Management Qualification (PMQ) is the flagship qualification of the Association for Project Management. Tens of thousands of project managers have chosen to obtain the internationally recognised International Project Management Association Level D certification.

If we can help with your professional development – let us know and we will let you know how

Via

PRINCE2 Benefits Management Approach

The value of the content of some of the best practice guides can often be lost in the detail of the manual and the focus on passing an exam. Therefore, we have pulled out some of the areas that we think will be of the most value to people so that they can act as a quick reference guide.

We have created a large range of these references that we hope will be useful to you, please stay in touch and let us know what you think.

Programme Management Business Case in a Nutshell

Rod Sowden the Aspire Europe Managing Director (and lead author of the current versions of MSP® and P3M3®) talks about the Business Case works at the programme level.

Hope you enjoy!

Visit and Subscribe to our NEW YouTube Channel here

MSP® and P3M3® are [registered] trade marks of AXELOS Limited, used under permission of AXELOS Limited. All rights reserved.

The nightmare project manager

We often hear about poor sponsorship as one of the reasons for project failure, but in this post, the sponsors have taken their own back.

We often talk to project teams about the art of project management and the need to step into their safety zone and see the business as their customer not their victim, so here are a few of the characteristics that some of our sponsor clients have identified as making up the nightmare project manager:

  1. Talks in jargon whenever asked basic questions, defensive when challenged
  2. Focuses so much on process, they can’t think for themselves, love filling in forms
  3. Is a hero at heart and loves last minute firefighting to get the project over the line, it will be alright on the night
  4. Focuses on project management not the business outcomes
  5. Dives into  technical detail about the solution rather than trying to understand the business challenges
  6. Sees stakeholder management as everyone’s problem but theirs
  7. Seen it all before, 25 years experience sadly it’s the same every year
  8. Believes that the “can do” approach will overcome their incompetence
  9. Planning is a pointless exercise because everything will change anyway, so what is the point
  10. Talks a good game, vanishes when the going gets tough

Deadly Sins: Adopting Agile

Over the last year or two we have reviewed a number of programmes and projects that are using an “agile” approach. There are a number of common problems which have come to light that should be of interest to any organisation setting out on an agile endeavour for the first time.

Agile, Lean or project management are not cures for unproductive or incompetent teams, weak leadership or poor performance management.

All methods have their place and can add value and improve performance but none on their own are a panacea as they all depend on the capability of the people involved.
This article sets out some of the key lessons that we have taken from our reviews.

If you would like to know more about Agile, why not consider one of our training courses

Fresh Look: Programmes without Blueprints

Fresh Look: Is a series of articles taking a look at common topics to try to come up with some new ideas and insight into problems that seem to repeat themselves across many organisations.

Is your programme exhibiting any of these characteristics?

  1. Project issues dominate the programme board
  2. Unidentified risks start to materialise a bit too quickly
  3. Benefits are rarely discussed
  4. The BCM lacks authority or purpose
  5. Many uncontrolled or unclear dependencies between projects and other initiatives start to manifest themselves
  6. Decision making is ad-hoc, reactionary or just slow
  7. Stakeholder resistance begins to increase and programme loses support. Programmes either lack momentum or feel like a roller coaster

If that is the case, your programme probably does not have a blueprint, and is probably out of control.
In this article, we liken a programme to a yacht and explain how it is not what you see on the surface that is providing the control, it is what happens below the waterline that is important. If your programme is exhibiting any of these characteristics then the article is for you.